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University of Wisconsin–Madison

UW -Madison’s Health Sciences community embraces Go Big Read.

When In Defense of Food was chosen as the inaugural Go Big Read selection, members of the health sciences community at UW immediately recognized the opportunity to connect Michael Pollan’s work with broader discussions of the role of diet in health and wellness. September 21-25th has been declared “In Defense of Food Week” at the Health Sciences Learning Center (HSLC), and a series of events will connect the themes of food, health, and the choices available to Wisconsinites.

All events are in HSLC 1335 unless otherwise noted, and all are welcome!

Monday, 9/21, 12:15-1:15 pm
“Backyard Food Options: Lessons Learned in Backyard Gardening and Chicken Raising” Monica Theis, Department of Food Sciences, and Daniel Marleau, School of Medicine and Public Health, will talk about how you can bring healthy food to your own yard.

Tuesday, 9/22, 3-4 pm
“Food and Health: How to Choose Well” Gail Underbakke, nutrition coordinator for UW Health’s Preventive Cardiology Program, will walk attendees through the food landscape, focusing on interpreting nutritional labels. The opening reception of “It’s Good For You! 100 Years of the Art and Science of Eating” follows from 4-6, in the Ebling Library Historical Reading Room.

Wednesday, 9/23, 12:15-1:15 pm
“Farmers’ Market Traditions” Veteran farmers’ market vendors Mary and Quentin Carpenter will share photographs, oral histories, anecdotes, insider’s tips, recipes and more concerning this engaging tradition of commerce, confusion, fun and fresh food.

Thursday, 9/24, 12:15-1:15 pm
“The Longevity Code” Dr. Zorba Paster will discuss his book The Longevity Code: Your Personal Prescription for a Longer, Sweeter Life.

Friday, 9/25, noon-1 pm, room 1225
In Defense of Food book discussion, sponsored by Ebling Library and the UW School of Medicine and Public Health.

3 thoughts on “UW -Madison’s Health Sciences community embraces Go Big Read.

  1. We are now looking at buying 5 acres in east Texas with trees and water to do some of our own food raising. It is a good idea and safer better food.