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University of Wisconsin–Madison

Tag: Women’s Education

The Bravest Girls in the World

In 2014 Glamour magazine created The Girl Project. The Girl Project is is a philanthropic global initiative that raises money to help young women all around the world receive a secondary education. The goal is to help the fifty million girls around the globe who are denied the right to an education.The Girl Project addresses the barriers girls face in pursuing an education by creating a way for women in the United States to support the education of girls all around the world.

Our readers were energized by Malala’s bravery and wanted to know what they could do to help courageous girls like her. Educating girls is proven to grow communities and even cut out the roots of terrorism. The fact that a group of women in, say, Des Moines can send a girl to school in Pakistan is one of the most optimistic acts I can think of, and we’re proud to partner with these knowledgeable organizations to help make it possible.

–Cindi Leive, Glamour Editor-In-Chief
The Girl Project highlights the stories of these brave girls, calling them Girl Heroes. To read their stories click here. To find out more about The Girl Project click here.

All Girls Deserve Free, Quality Education

Malala met Amina in Nigeria this past summer and found out they have quite a bit in common. Both stood up for their education in countries where girls’ education is under attack. Both girls are now advocates for girls’ and children’s education. And now both girls are demanding that world leaders vote for 12 years of free, quality education for all children in the world when they meet this September. In particular they are fighting for all women and girls to be educated. Far too many women are only educated through primary school. Malala and Amina know this is not enough

When we imagine the power of all our sisters standing together on the shoulders of a quality education — our joy knows no bounds.

 –Malala and Amina
For more information click here.

“Empowering Women and Girls around the Globe” Panel Discussion

Our four panelist– AraceliLearn

how local access to information is critical to improving the lives of women and
girls in South Africa, Kenya, Nicaragua, and rural China. How Libraries and Information
Services are Empowering Women and Girls around the Globe
is
a free public event on Tuesday
evening, February 10 from 6:00–7:30 p.m. in 460 Memorial Library, 728 State
Street
.

Alonso, Lisa Ebert, Louise Robbins and Karla Strand — will talk about
their work in other countries. This event is part of the “Go Big Read”
community reading program which this year features the book, I am Malala, the true story of the
youngest Nobel Peace Prize winner. Light refreshments will follow the panel
discussion. This event is sponsored by the Friends of the UW – Madison
Libraries, Office of the Gender & Women’s Studies Librarian, Department of
Gender and Women’s Studies and the Go Big Read program.

Araceli Alonso is an Associate Faculty at UW-Madison in the
Department of Gender and Women’s Studies and the School of Medicine and
Public Health. Dr. Alonso is also the Founder and Director of Health by
Motorbike (HbM), a nonprofit that provides medical services and health literacy
to women and girls from remote and isolated villages in Africa. For her
work with women’s health and women’s rights in rural Kenya, in 2013 Dr. Alonso
received two of the world most prestigious awards—the United Nations Public Service
Award and the Jefferson Award for Public Service.

Karla Strand directs the Office of the Gender & Women’s Studies
Librarian for the University of Wisconsin System, the premier resource for the
support of gender and women’s studies scholarship and librarianship. Prior to this, she was employed at
Carroll University where she served as Diversity Librarian and Associate
Director. Strand is currently completing her doctorate in Information
Science via the University of Pretoria in South Africa where she is researching
how public librarians in KwaZulu-Natal province can help alleviate information
inequality in their communities.

Nikumbuke Library Patron

While
completing her master’s degree in Community and Organizational Leadership, Lisa
Ebert went to Nicaragua through the Wisconsin/Nicaragua Partners program, part
of the nationwide Partners in the America organization established by President
Kennedy. Her Nicaraguan experience changed Ms. Ebert’s focus for her master’s
program to women’s empowerment issues and more specifically to how the
Wisconsin/Nicaragua Partners organization helps to empower women who
participate in their Learning Centers. She has returned to Nicaragua two
additional times.

Louise S.
Robbins is Professor and Director Emerita of the School of Library and Information
Studies of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She has also taught library
courses at universities in China, Korea, Japan, and Kyrgyzstan. Since 2006,
Robbins has been involved with the Evergreen Education Foundation, which
provides various kinds of assistance to schools and public libraries in rural
China.
The event sponsors and panelists also encourage you to read the remarkable
story of Malala Yousafzai in this year’s Go Big Read book, I Am Malala.
When the Taliban took control of the Swat Valley in Pakistan, Malala refused to
be silenced and fought for her right to an education.
More
information about the event can be found on the event calendar and at the Friends of the Library.

House of Representatives passes Malala Yousafzai Scholarship Act

Last week the United States House of Representatives passed the Malala Yousafzai Scholarship Act. The act encourages the State Department and U.S. Agency for International Development to continue to support Pakistani education initiatives, especially those for women. The act would also expand the number of scholarships available to Pakistani women under the Merit and Needs-Based Scholarship Program. The Act was named after Malala Yousafzai in honor of all of the hurdles she has overcome in her life to become the more prevalent education activist in the world.

The bill’s sponsor, Rep. Ros-Lehtinen, said that it was imperative to promote women’s education in developing countries that limit women’s rights. Ros-Lehtinen said, “we know that access to education is a game changer for any society. A society in which women have unfettered access to the education system expands the horizons not just for the girls and the women involved, but for everyone in their community and their nation.”

The next step for the act to become a bill is for it to be passed in the Senate. We will keep you updated on the Act’s status.

Embattled Ideologies: I am Malala and the Question of Women’s Education in South Asia Event Today

The UW Lubar Institute for the Study of the Abrahamic Religions is hosting an expert panel today from 4:00-6:00 pm in the Sheldon Lubar Faculty Commons, Room 7200, in the UW Law School.

The event brings together four expert scholars on Islam and Education to discuss the challenging and complex questions surrounding women’s education in tribal Pakistan, the historical encounter of Islam and modernity, and the cultural problematics of international aid.

If you are interested in a deeper intellectual conversation surrounding these issues you will not want to miss this event!