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Tag: Uw-Madison libraries

Science Expeditions

“‘Science Marches On’ in Chemistry Lab…”, UW Digital Collections

It’s been awhile, Go Big Readers! I hope everyone’s spring semester has been going well, and that you all got to take advantage of the nice weather over spring break.

For the past several weeks, the Go Big Read office has been kept very busy working on finding our Go Big Read book for 2013-14. The selection process is almost done: after receiving nearly 200 diverse and fascinating suggestions from all over the campus and Madison communities (thanks for those, by the way!), we’ve whittled our list down to our final choice, and we’re pretty excited about next year’s program! I can tell you that we’re doing something we’ve never done before. You’ll get to hear more about that later in the semester!

In the meantime, what are you up to this weekend? April 5, 6 and 7, UW-Madison and the Science Alliance present the 11th Annual Science Expeditions, a weekend of learning and exploration for all ages. On-campus events are free (!) and open to the public. You can even take a free Science Expeditions Trolley from place to place, while getting a free scientastic tour from a VIP tour guide. There are over 45 Exploration Stations, so it’s sure to be a busy weekend!

Included in the weekend’s events are free tours of Fallout, the Radioactive-inspired exhibit at Ebling Library. If you still haven’t seen it, first of all, what have you been doing with your life?! But also, this is a fantastic opportunity. Go get scienced this weekend!

You can find more information about Science Expeditions, including a list of Exploration Stations, info about the Expedition Trolley, and sneak peeks at Science Spectacular shows, at this link.

Wednesday Nite @ the Lab

If you’ve gotten to see “Fallout” at Ebling Library–or even if you haven’t!–here’s your chance to find out how the exhibit was put together! Join Ebling Library for Wednesday Nite @ the Lab on Wednesday, February 20th from 7:00-8:15 in Room 1111, 425 Henry Mall.

Curator Micaela Sullivan-Fowler

“Fallout” is an examination of subjects such as the early use of x-rays
in diagnosis & treatment, occupational hazards of working with
radiation, the military use of x-rays, the history of tanning, a UW
connection with Marie Curie, bomb shelters in the 1960’s, the bombing of
Hiroshima & concerns with nuclear accidents like Three-Mile Island,
UW’s Departments of Medical Physics & Radiology, shoe fitting
fluoroscopes and the like.

Micaela Sullivan-Fowler has been the curator and history of health
sciences librarian at Ebling Library for the past 14 years. She acts as
the liaison to the Department of Medical History & Bioethics within
the School of Medicine and Public Health. She works with graduate and
undergraduate students, helping them navigate the print and electronic
worlds when using primary material for their research papers. In designing exhibits, Micaela’s
primary goals are to highlight books in Ebling’s collections, and to
create thematic pathways between the subjects in the individual cases.
While the current exhibit on the history of radioactivity, x-rays and
radium has had glowing reviews, it was perhaps the most difficult to
tell in such a limited space. The discovery of so many interesting
stories is what Micaela loves to share…

Moderated Book Discussion and Exhibit

Have you seen Fallout at Ebling Library yet? If not, here’s your chance!

On Thursday, February 7 from 5:00-6:00pm, Ebling is hosting a viewing of the exhibit in its Historic Reading Room. And as if that’s not enough, History of Science professor Dr. Richard Staley will be holding a moderated discussion of Radioactive from 6:00-7:00pm. It’s a perfect double dose of science-y goodness! For more information, see the flyer below.

Dear Faculty,

Here on the west side of campus we have an engaging exhibition entitled: Fallout: The Mixed Blessing of Radiation & the Public Health. One visitor suggested, “…this is the coolest compilation of things I didn’t know about radiation.” The exhibition covers the time period of 1895 to the present and is culturally contextualized in terms of how x-rays, radiation and radioactivity have influenced diagnostics, treatment, occupational health protocols, politics, the teaching of radiology, the public’s engagement with fallout shelters, the aftermath of nuclear accidents and the like.

In addition to a narrative which weaves together the conflation of these three fascinating topics, x-rays, radiation and radiotherapy, there are artifacts, photos and provocative printed matter which illustrate this multi layered subject.
For example, one can learn the story of UW’s unfulfilled connection with Madame Curie or see the switch (usually held by the University Archives) that cut off the electricity before the first atomic bomb detonation.

I can give tours and explanations of the contents of the cases (there are 13). I can talk to students about how one designs such an exhibit. I can talk about what did not fit in the exhibit. I can discuss how one can start with this small bit of primary material and design an entire research project based on one resource.

In short, if you are looking for a field trip to take up your student’s class time when you have to go to a conference, if you’d like to bring your class, if you’d like to assign a visit to the class for extra credit…this is an open invitation to visit. Especially for those who may be reading Radioactive as part of UW’s Go Big Read program, Fallout was imagined in response to that initiative, so it would be particularly germane to your class.

Let me know if I can help with your Spring Semester…

Micaela Sullivan-Fowler, Ebling Library for the Health Sciences, 750 Highland Ave. Madison (608) 262-2402 or msullivan@library.wisc.edu

Here are a few links to add to the excitement.

Telling Science Stories

What happens when non-scientists tell science stories?  What does science look like from a humanities perspective?  If you’re curious, head to the fourth floor of Helen C. White today (October 25) at 4pm.  Go Big Read and the Holz Center are co-sponsoring a panel that will answer these questions and more!  More information is available here.  See you at 4:00!

Brooke Williams, GBR graduate student

Memorial Library Curie Exhibit

Pierre and Marie Curie with their bicycles.  Image source.

Next time you’re in Memorial Library, don’t just run past whoever’s checking IDs and head straight for the elevators!  Stop for a minute and enjoy this fascinating exhibit on Marie and Pierre Curie.  It’s right in the lobby, so you can easily check it out as you rush up to the stacks or to hunt out a study space.  Below is the official description from Robin Rider in Special Collections:
“In conjunction with this year’s Go Big Read
selection, Radioactive
by Lauren Redniss, an exhibit in the lobby of Memorial Library
highlights both the scientific work of Marie and Pierre Curie and
articles about them in publications aimed at the general public.
Marie and Pierre Curie — together, separately,
or in collaboration with others — produced scores of scientific
articles and longer works, some of which are on display. The dates
stamped within the volumes of such publications show that the
University of Wisconsin library received many of them quite
quickly, sometimes within just a few weeks of their publication in
Europe – this, at a time when such European publications reached
Madison by a combination of ship and rail.
The exhibit also includes a sampling of mainly
American publications from the 1920s and 1930s illustrating the
place of Marie and Pierre Curie in the public eye (and the public
imagination). All of the volumes on display are from the holdings
of Memorial Library.”
The image featured above comes from Marie Curie’s book Pierre Curie. Avec une études des “Carnets de laboratoire.” Paris: Denoël, 1955.  Full citation here.
Brooke Williams, Go Big Read grad student

Marie Curie & Radium

The talented trainers at DesignLab have done it again.  A few weeks ago, we showed you the Radioactive-inspired pages they made as part of their “training boot camp” (if you haven’t checked those out, definitely do so now!).  Today, DesignLab TA Kevin Gibbons sent us a comic he created, depicting Marie Curie’s “love-kill” relationship with radium, as part of a workshop on e-writing assignments. (Click to enlarge.)

Want to make your own comic or other media project?  Visit the DesignLab website and find out how to set up an appointment with one of their talented TAs.

As a sidenote, we love it when people send us visual work inspired by or relating to Radioactive!  If you’d like one of your creations to be featured on the blog, send us an email at gobigread@library.wisc.edu.  Please refer to this post for further information about submission guidelines.

Brooke Williams, GBR grad student

Exploring the Wisconsin Science Festival: Radioactive READing

The Wisconsin Science Festival opens September 27-30 at venues
across the state. To celebrate, campus libraries are highlighting a couple of
university library-related events and exhibitors with a special series
called Exploring the Wisconsin Science Festival

The background in the new Bucky READ poster might look pretty familiar, particularly if you’ve been paging through Radioactive by Lauren Redniss, this year’s Go Big Read title.

Dying to snag one of these posters for your dorm room, office, or classroom? Send a note to bucky@library.wisc.edu or stop by the Ask-a-Science Librarian table at next week’s Wisconsin Science Festival.
Posters come in two sizes: 18×24″ or 9×12″


Post from UW-Madison Libraries News & Events 
Writer: Laura Damon-Moore 

DesignLab creates their own Radioactive images

DesignLab will be supporting projects associated with this year’s Go Big Read program.  During training boot camp, the DesignLab TAs each produced a response to the content and aesthetics of Radioactive by responding to one of the stories or sections of the book by creating an additional page or layout of a 2-page spread.

DesignLab is located in College Library, room 2250.  To find out more or to make an appointment with a TA, check out the DesignLab website here.  In the meantime, enjoy these gorgeous Radioactive-themed pages.  (Click to enlarge–it’s worth it!)



“Eusapia,” Dominique Haller



“Scintillating,” Melanie Wallace



“Glo Paint,”T.J. Kalaitzidis



“The Other Curie,” Erin Schambereck

 

“Radioactive Articles,” Steel Wagstaff

 

“Radioactive Man,” Mitch Schwartz



“Family,” Kevin Gibbons



“Conversation,” Dan Banda



Content Submitted by Rosemary Bodolay
Associate Director for Design Lab
 

Suggested Read: Dignifying Science: Stories About Women Scientists



Have you read about the story of Marie Curie and her life as a scientist in this year’s book, Radioactive? Interested in reading more about other successful female scientists, such as Lise Meitner who made contributions to nuclear physics and radioactivity and Rosalind Franklin who is known for her work with X-ray crystallography and DNA? Pick up the graphic novel, Dignifying Science: Stories About Women Scientists!

Like Radioactive, this book is also very artistic in its depiction of these women, not only in their field of work, but also their in their personal lives. This short graphic novel is an fun and easy read, as well as informative. If you’re interested in learning more about stories of women scientists like Marie Curie, you can find this book in our UW Library System.

Photo courtesy of G.T. Labs.