Skip to main content
University of Wisconsin–Madison

Tag: UW-Madison community

It’s what WE do.

The Center for First Year Experience released a video this week featuring young and bright minded students enjoying the experience of attending the University of Wisconsin.

Students are offered resources from University Housing, Recreational Sports, Wisconsin Athletics, UW-Madison Police Department, Wisconsin Union, and our own Go Big Read Program.

All of these resources help students have the best Wisconsin Experience possible!

Comment below to share what you think of the video.

 

UW-Madison News reports on use of Go Big Read book on campus

Malala speaking to the United Nations in the Summer of 2013

The University of Wisconsin-Madison News site released an article this morning entitled, “Campus community reading ‘I Am Malala’ as semester begins.”

The article discusses why Chancellor Becky Blank chose the book from a list of possible books with a theme on service. The Chancellor told the 5,500+ incoming freshmen and transfer students at convocation that “Malala’s story is about the value of doing something – anything, even when it’s scary and even when you’re not sure it’s the exact right solution -rather than sitting around feeling hopeless.”

The article also talks to members of the campus community that have chosen to use the book this fall. Over 35+ courses have decided to use the book in their course material. Disciplines range from anthropology, English, enviornmental studies, nursing, political science, and education.

A group new to the Go Big Read program is the Lubar Institute for the Study of the Abrahamic Religions. The group was established to promote mutual understanding and civility among Jews, Christians, and Muslim after tensions arose following 9/11. To learn more about the different courses and groups participating in Go Big Read this year read the entire article by following this link: Campus community reading ‘I Am Malala’ as semester begins

Shiza Shahid: “There are no Superheroes, Just Us”
“There are no superheroes, just us. We are the ones we’ve been waiting for.” These powerful words came from Shiza Shahid at the TEDxMidAtlantic 2013 conference. The theme of the conference was “Start Now”, and conference organizers asked Shiza to be a featured speaker on the theme. Shiza shared three lessons that helped her begin her journey to becoming a successful social entrepreneur, and have shaped her life choices. The talk focuses on human connections, creating change in the world, and following your heart.

The presentation is a powerful introduction to the story of Malala and Shiza’s friendship, from their first meeting to the origins of the Malala Fund. Shiza’s voice is heavy with sorrow as she recalls the moment she learned that Malala had been shot. Yet, her sorrow turns to anger and then hope as she recounts how she realized that across the world people were protesting that a girl had been shot for going to school, and were praying and hoping for Malala’s recovery. Shiza ends her speech by saying “I am Malala”, and explaining how powerful of a statement that is to her.

Shiza will be the keynote speaker for the Go Big Read program, and will be giving a public speech on October 27th at Union South’s Varsity Hall. This TEDxMidAtlantic talk is an indication of the enthusiasm and eloquence that Shiza will be bringing to her speech.  

Go Big Read selects “I Am Malala” for 2014-15

The Taliban thought bullets would silence Malala Yousafzai.

But instead they made her voice stronger, and today the teenager from
Pakistan is known worldwide as a transformative advocate who embodies
the power of education for girls.

Her book, “I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban,” is the latest selection for Go Big Read, UW-Madison’s common-reading program.

Go Big Read organizers encouraged the campus community to suggest
titles that fit into a theme of service. Chancellor Rebecca Blank chose
“I Am Malala” from the short list that a selection committee culled from
nearly 200 nominated titles.

“Malala’s story offers our students and campus community a firsthand
account from a part of the world that is continuously in the news,”
Blank says. “Readers will connect with these experiences through her
convincing description of how she became a voice of protest against the
social restrictions she faced. Her story will lead our students to
reflect on the opportunities they have to use their own voice in the
world.”

Yousafzai begins the book, co-written with British journalist
Christina Lamb, by recounting the moment she was shot in the head in
October 2012 on her way home from school in Pakistan’s Swat Valley. The
rest of the book retraces the events that led up to that moment in a
region that is one of the world’s hotspots.

“It is difficult to imagine a chronicle of a war more moving, apart
from perhaps the diary of Anne Frank,” said a review in The Washington
Post. Time Out New York said Yousafzai’s touching story, “will not only
inform you of changing conditions in Pakistan, but inspire your
rebellious spirit.”
Yousafzai was 11 when she began writing a blog anonymously for the
BBC, describing life under Taliban rule from her hometown of Mingora, in
the northwest region of Pakistan.

She was awarded the country’s National Peace Award in 2012, which has
since been renamed the National Malala Peace Prize.She was nominated
for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2013 and was recently named by TIME
magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world. She and
her family now live in England, where she continues to go to school.

“Let us pick up our books and our pens,” the now 16-year-old told
young leaders from 100 countries at the United Nations Youth Assembly in
New York last year. “They are our most powerful weapons. One child, one
teacher, one book, and one pen can change the world. Education is the
only solution.”
Patrick McBride, associate dean for students at the UW School of
Medicine and Public Health and a member of the selection committee, said
the story will remind readers why they can’t take their right to an
education for granted.

“The rights of women, and the values of freedom, family, and
education are championed by this remarkable family,” McBride says.
“While the title sounds simple, when we read in the introduction
of where those words are spoken, it will bring chills to the reader and
become a cry for freedom around the world.”

Karen Crossley, associate director of operations for the Morgridge
Center for Public Service, also served on the selection committee and
says Yousafzai being close in age to most UW undergraduates will capture
the attention of students.

“Malala’s commitment to composing a better world defines service in a highly personal way,” Crossley says.

Planning is underway for how students, faculty and staff will use the
book in classrooms and for special events associated with “I Am
Malala.”

Yousafzai will be in her senior year of high school and therefore
unable to come to campus, but organizers are arranging for a speaker
connected to the book who will give a public talk this fall.
UW-Madison instructors interested in using the book can request a review copy here.

Copies of the book will be given to first-year students at the
Chancellor’s Convocation for New Students and to students using the book
in their classes.

More information about the ongoing Go Big Read program and plans for this fall can be found here.

Jenny Price, UW-Madison University Communications

UW-Madison and the Peace Corps

Did you know that UW-Madison has a long, proud history with the Peace Corps? Last week, our campus was again named the nation’s “top producer of Peace Corps volunteers.” You can read more about our history with the Peace Corps here.

Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

This news comes at a particularly interesting time, as Go Big Read’s 2014-15 theme is “service.” Last week, the selection committee met to establish a shortlist of books to consider; for the next few weeks, we’ll be reading and discussing these books. It’s an exciting time, and while we can’t give any hints yet, we can’t wait until we make an official announcement!

There are a lot of reasons to be proud of being a Badger, and our history of service is definitely one of them. You can find out more about the Peace Corps on the organization website, and check out the annual rankings of universities. If you’re interested in volunteering for the Peace Corps, stop by the UW-Madison Peace Corps office in 156 Red Gym, or visit their website.

Go Big Read seeks titles focused on service for 2014-15 program

Have you read any great books lately? Think something you’ve read would make a great Go Big Read selection? Let us know! For the 2014-2015 academic year, we are seeking books with a focus on service:

Here at home and around the world, people are called to serve their
countries, their communities and other missions. Some volunteer, some
are drafted, and others find themselves pressed into service by their
circumstances.

But what does it mean to serve? Who is compelled to serve and why?
And in what ways does it affect those who serve and the people around
them?

If you’ve recently read something that engages with the theme of service, we want to hear about it. The deadline to submit books for consideration is February 1, 2014, and we are accepting both fiction and non-fiction nominations. You can use this form to nominate titles, and read more about our selection criteria here, and also see if your favorite title is on our running suggestion list.

We can’t wait to hear from you!

Using the book in the spring?

Instructors! Are you planning to use A Tale for the Time Being in your spring courses? Do you want your students to be able to access the book for free? If so, fill out our request form and we’ll add you to our list of participating courses for the spring.

For students in spring courses, we send out vouchers that can be redeemed at six campus libraries (Chemistry Library, College Library, Ebling Library, Memorial Library, Steenbock Library and Wendt Commons) for free copies of the book. If you need us to send you hard copies of the book for your teaching assistants, or if you need your own desk copy, you can indicate so in the request form.

If you’re still not sure whether you’ll use A Tale for the Time Being this spring, don’t worry! Just send us an email (gobigread at library.wisc.edu) to request a free review copy.

Guest Post: Reflections on the Nov. 14 talk by Professor Gene Phillips

It was enlightening to see the concept of Zen Buddhism depicted in
images at the talk by Professor Gene Phillips (Professor in the
Department of Art History; Director of the Center for East Asian
Studies). One of the things that Professor Phillips discussed was how
Zen monks in medieval Japan were commissioned to paint inspirational ink
images based on koans (questions that a Zen Buddhist master gives to
his disciples in order to help them understand the concepts of “mu”
[nothingness, emptiness] and the universe’s fundamental non-duality,
which leads them to enlightenment: the goal, the ultimate state of mind,
in Buddhism).

To learn more, see Professor Phillips’s book, The Practices of Painting in Japan, 1475-1500.

Photo by Hiromi Naka, Japan Outreach Specialist, the Center for East Asian Studies

Ayako Yoshiumra, the Center for East Asian Studies

Guest Post: How to Read a Book

A Tale for the Time Being invites us to read in a slightly
different way than many of us are used to. 
Not only does the book alternate between two narrators, but when we read
Nao’s diary, we’re reading it as annotated by Ruth, whose chapters are told from in the third-person voice.  It took me a while to realize that the
footnotes in Nao’s diary are written as though they were written by the
character Ruth, not the author Ruth.

If you’re interested in other approaches to reading, you may want to listen to
the November 24, 2013, edition of the public radio show To the Best of Our Knowledge.  The Nov 24 show is all about “How to Read a Book.” Hearing Billy Collins’ read his poem “Reader,” immediately made me think
of Tale.  There’s also an interview with an author who
wrote a novel which features another novel written in the margins of the book,
among other thought-provoking segments.

Beth Harper
Reference Librarian, Memorial Library

Go Big Read Films and Visual Resources

I would like to recommend some visual resources from our campus
libraries that relate to this year’s Go Big Read book, A Tale for the
Time Being
.

Documentary films about Kamikaze Pilots:

The Last Kamikaze: Testimonials from WWII Suicide Pilots

(streamed online; UW login needed)
http://search.library.wisc.edu/catalog/ocn677927717
http://search.library.wisc.edu/catalog/ocn701798421

Wings of Defeat (DVD)
(D792 J3 W56 2007)
http://search.library.wisc.edu/catalog/ocn259700968

Zen Buddhism:
Erleuchtung Garantiert (Enlightenment Guaranteed) (DVD)
(PN1997 E723 2000)
http://search.library.wisc.edu/catalog/ocm57362252
Two
middle-aged German brothers travel to Japan in search of inner peace.
But many obstacles await them. Will they find the key to enlightenment?

Zen (DVD)
(BQ9449 D657 Z46 2011)
http://search.library.wisc.edu/catalog/ocn793432576
This recent feature film, starring the famous kabuki actor Kankuro Nakamura VI, relates the biography of the Zen master Dogen, who figures prominently in Ozeki’s book.

One Precept: Zen Buddhism in America

(streamed online; UW login needed)
http://search.library.wisc.edu/catalog/ocn701798307

Funeral Rites in Japan:
Departures (Okuribito) (DVD)
(PN1997.2 O387 2009)
http://search.library.wisc.edu/catalog/ocn754887460
Winner
of the 2009 Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, this film
chronicles an ex-cellist’s transition to a new life as a mortician in
his hometown in the Tohoku region of Japan.

Ayako Yoshimura
Japanese Studies Collection Assistant