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University of Wisconsin–Madison

Tag: Shiza Shahid

ASPIREist Features Clint Smith

ASPIREist is a new half-hour reality feature news show. Each episode has three features ranging a wide variety of topics. The purpose of the show, according to its website, is to “empower 21st century viewers to take action on issues that matter.” Each feature ends with a way for the viewer to take action about that particular issue.

The first episode features Clint Smith, a researcher of the intersections between race, education, and incarceration from Harvard University. His feature called “The New Jim Crow,” like the Michelle Alexander book, focuses on issues similar to what Bryan Stevenson talks about in Just Mercy. He talks about the the racial inequality in the criminal justice system, children in prison, and the greater problem of mass incarceration. View the feature below.

One of the show’s other personalities is Shiza Shahid, a previous Go Big Read speaker. To view her features, visit the ASPIREist YouTube page here.

For more information about ASPIREist, click here.

Shiza Shahid’s keynote talk is now available online!

People of all ages and backgrounds anxiously waited in line Monday night for the chance to hear Shiza Shahid speak about her experiences with Malala and her background as an activist. Varsity Hall quickly reached capacity, but auditorium doors were opened so that those who could not fit could still see and hear Shiza and over 700 viewers from home watched the live steam of her speech.

Shiza’s speech left the audience captivated, whether it was from the emotional videos she shared, or her own personal stories of triumph and heartbreak. The crowd was taken on a journey of this inspirational young woman’s life and when her story was complete she left the crowd with this parting advice, “We [all] have our struggles. We [all] have our fears, By
saying ‘I am Malala,’ we promise to try and be stronger than those
fears, than whatever is holding us back. I want you to remember, you are
Malala.” The crowd erupted into applause and gave Shiza a well deserved standing ovation.

If you were busy Monday night or even just want to
experience the talk again it is now available online, posted as a link below. A
captioned version will be available next week and I will be placing it
on this blog when it is ready.

Go Big Read Keynote Event 


If you have not finished this year’s Go Big Read book, “I Am Malala”, you will want to find the time this weekend to complete it before the keynote event on Monday!

On Monday Shiza Shahid will be visiting campus to deliver the Go Big Read keynote address. Shiza co-founded the Malala Fund with Malala and has been named on Forbes 30 under 30 list. She is a powerful and motivated woman that will no doubt deliver a powerful speech that you will not want to miss!

The event is at 7:00 p.m. at Union South in Varsity Hall on Monday, October 27th. You will want to arrive early since a large crowd is expected. The event is open to the public and no tickets are necessary.

There will be Q&A session after her speech. We hope to see you all there!

Suggest a Question for Shiza Shahid

Would you like to ask this year’s Go Big Read keynote speaker a question about the Malala Fund, her friendship with Malala, etc.?

Shiza Shahid’s October 27th lecture at Varsity Hall, Union South, is free and open to the public. The event will begin at 7 pm (doors open at 6 pm) and no tickets are required. We hope you’ll attend and invite anyone you know who might be interested.

Due to the large scale of the Varsity Hall event, some of the question and answer period will be moderated. Questions should be suggested in writing by October 17th. The moderator will select a representative set of questions and ask them to Shiza at the event.

If you would like to suggest a question, please post it as a comment to this blog post. Please also consider including your name and some very brief information about yourself (e.g., your major, unit, etc.).

* Please note that blog comments are moderated so there may be a delay of up to 24 hours between submitting your question and seeing it appear on the blog.

Shiza Shahid: “There are no Superheroes, Just Us”
“There are no superheroes, just us. We are the ones we’ve been waiting for.” These powerful words came from Shiza Shahid at the TEDxMidAtlantic 2013 conference. The theme of the conference was “Start Now”, and conference organizers asked Shiza to be a featured speaker on the theme. Shiza shared three lessons that helped her begin her journey to becoming a successful social entrepreneur, and have shaped her life choices. The talk focuses on human connections, creating change in the world, and following your heart.

The presentation is a powerful introduction to the story of Malala and Shiza’s friendship, from their first meeting to the origins of the Malala Fund. Shiza’s voice is heavy with sorrow as she recalls the moment she learned that Malala had been shot. Yet, her sorrow turns to anger and then hope as she recounts how she realized that across the world people were protesting that a girl had been shot for going to school, and were praying and hoping for Malala’s recovery. Shiza ends her speech by saying “I am Malala”, and explaining how powerful of a statement that is to her.

Shiza will be the keynote speaker for the Go Big Read program, and will be giving a public speech on October 27th at Union South’s Varsity Hall. This TEDxMidAtlantic talk is an indication of the enthusiasm and eloquence that Shiza will be bringing to her speech.  

Shiza Shahid, Co-Founder of the Malala Fund, is Keynote Speaker for Go Big Read

In 2014, 57 million children are not enrolled in school. According to the United Nations, 53% of the children are girls, and 2/3 of the illiterate people in the world are women. Shiza Shahid is working with Malala Yousafzai to reverse this epidemic and empower girls to reach their potential through education.
 Shiza first met Malala when she was a sophomore in college at Stanford University. Shiza grew up in Pakistan just three hours from Malala’s home, and when she heard about Malala’s fight to keep her school open she knew that she needed to help. That summer Shiza planned a camp for Malala and 27 other girls in the capital of Pakistan. The camp’s goal was to empower them to be entrepreneurs and activists. 
It was only a few years later that Malala was shot by the Taliban, and Shiza traveled to be by her side in England. While recovering in the hospital, Malala realized that she wanted to turn her tragedy into a movement that could inspire and empower girls across the world. Malala, Malala’s father, and Shiza decided to create an organization with a mission to empower girls through education so that they can become agents of change in their communities. In October of 2013 the Malala Fund was officially launched. The Malala fund works with local partners around the world to help the 600 million girls in developing countries receive an education. The fund believes that education empowers girls to raise their voices, to unlock their potential, and to demand change. 
Shiza will be on campus October 27-28 to meet with small groups of students and to deliver a public talk at Varsity Hall.
Links to the Malala Fund’s website, Facebook, and Twitter are below: