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University of Wisconsin–Madison

Tag: Radioactive

Playing Radioactive games

It’s Friday, and what’s more, it’s a cold, gray, drizzly Friday.  Hopefully, the weekend will bring us some nice weather, so we can get out and enjoy the slowly-changing leaves and all those other lovely autumn things (after all, today officially marks the start of the new season!). But for now, it’s Friday, and it’s the perfect kind of day to spend inside.

With that said, I’m going to point everyone in the direction of this beautiful website, which has been on the blog before.  For those who haven’t checked it out yet, the site is a collaboration between the New York Public Library and Parsons the New School for Design.  Intended to work with last year’s exhibit at the famous public library on 42nd Street and 5th Avenue in New York City, the website is very much in the aesthetic of the book, but also includes videos, games and other interactive features.

With the “Curiograph,” you can make your own (digital) cyanotype images in just a few short steps; you can also explore the Curies’ laboratory, simulated with items from the NYPL’s collections, and watch a video on how to make a real cyanotype print.

(And if you’re interested in doing so, then I’m also going to point you over here, to information about a cyanotype workshop that’s coming in October, hosted by the Madison Public Library and the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art!)

My personal favorite game, however, is the Raidon Game: follow various mini-missions to collect all the crystals needed and deliver them to the Curies.  It’s a little like living inside the world of the book, if only for a few minutes.

So there you have it.  The best way to spend a rainy Friday afternoon?  Easy answer: playing Radioactive games with Pierre and Marie!

Have fun!

Brooke Williams, grad student assistant for Go Big Read

Exploring the Wisconsin Science Festival: Radioactive READing

The Wisconsin Science Festival opens September 27-30 at venues
across the state. To celebrate, campus libraries are highlighting a couple of
university library-related events and exhibitors with a special series
called Exploring the Wisconsin Science Festival

The background in the new Bucky READ poster might look pretty familiar, particularly if you’ve been paging through Radioactive by Lauren Redniss, this year’s Go Big Read title.

Dying to snag one of these posters for your dorm room, office, or classroom? Send a note to bucky@library.wisc.edu or stop by the Ask-a-Science Librarian table at next week’s Wisconsin Science Festival.
Posters come in two sizes: 18×24″ or 9×12″


Post from UW-Madison Libraries News & Events 
Writer: Laura Damon-Moore 

DesignLab creates their own Radioactive images

DesignLab will be supporting projects associated with this year’s Go Big Read program.  During training boot camp, the DesignLab TAs each produced a response to the content and aesthetics of Radioactive by responding to one of the stories or sections of the book by creating an additional page or layout of a 2-page spread.

DesignLab is located in College Library, room 2250.  To find out more or to make an appointment with a TA, check out the DesignLab website here.  In the meantime, enjoy these gorgeous Radioactive-themed pages.  (Click to enlarge–it’s worth it!)



“Eusapia,” Dominique Haller



“Scintillating,” Melanie Wallace



“Glo Paint,”T.J. Kalaitzidis



“The Other Curie,” Erin Schambereck

 

“Radioactive Articles,” Steel Wagstaff

 

“Radioactive Man,” Mitch Schwartz



“Family,” Kevin Gibbons



“Conversation,” Dan Banda



Content Submitted by Rosemary Bodolay
Associate Director for Design Lab
 

“Go Big Read marries art and science”

 Image courtesy of Harper-Collins

Today’s Inside UW-Madison, the university’s newsletter for faculty and staff, includes this fantastic article by Jenny Price about Radioactive.  It’s a great discussion of one of the best things about this year’s Go Big Read pick: its widespread appeal.  Radioactive is not just a science book, although it deals with plenty of science; it’s not just an art book, although it’s certainly very artistic; and it’s not just a biography, although it certainly sheds light on Marie Curie’s private life.  Below, my favorite quote from the article:

The book is an arresting mash-up of art and science, with cyanotype images and luminous pages contributing to the emotional impact of a story about the human side of innovation and discovery.

Maybe that’s why Radioactive is so interesting to so many people: it’s a human story.  And of course that means the book can’t be just any one thing, because people aren’t just any one thing, either.

The article also talks about how members of the faculty will be incorporating the book into their courses, from introductory biology to journalism.  Have you gotten your copy yet?

Posted by Brooke Williams, (new) grad student assistant at the Go Big Read program

Suggested Read: Dignifying Science: Stories About Women Scientists



Have you read about the story of Marie Curie and her life as a scientist in this year’s book, Radioactive? Interested in reading more about other successful female scientists, such as Lise Meitner who made contributions to nuclear physics and radioactivity and Rosalind Franklin who is known for her work with X-ray crystallography and DNA? Pick up the graphic novel, Dignifying Science: Stories About Women Scientists!

Like Radioactive, this book is also very artistic in its depiction of these women, not only in their field of work, but also their in their personal lives. This short graphic novel is an fun and easy read, as well as informative. If you’re interested in learning more about stories of women scientists like Marie Curie, you can find this book in our UW Library System.

Photo courtesy of G.T. Labs.