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Tag: Malala Yousafzai

TBT: Emma Watson interviews Malala Yousafzai

NPR profiled a recent interview with Malala Yousafzai in the article “Viral Video: Emma Watson Inspires Malala to Call Herself A Feminist.” The video shows Emma Watson, a U.N. Goodwill Ambassador, having a conversation with Malala for the Into Film Festival. The annual, free film festival is a celebration of film and education for 5-19 year olds across the United Kingdom.

Watson and Malala talked about Malala’s new film “He Named Me Malala.” In the interview Malala said that she hopes it is “not just a movie but a movement.” Malala also talked about how she was inspired by Watson’s 2014 HeForShe speech by saying “When you said ‘if not now, when? If not me, who?’ I decided that there’s no way and there’s nothing wrong by calling yourself a feminist, so I am a feminist. And feminism is another word for equality.” They concluded the conversation by talking about the importance of education for all girls and all children around the world.

Watch the interview below.

To read the article “Viral Video: Emma Watson Inspires Malala to Call Herself A Feminist” click here.

Watch the trailer for “He Named Me Malala” below.

 

Good Leadership is Key: Desmond Tutu on Bryan Stevenson and Malala Yousafzai

Desmond Tutu, South African humanitarian and social rights activist, discusses good leadership in a recent Vanity Fair article titled “Why Desond Tutu Thinks Bryan Stevenson is ‘Shaping the Moral Universe.'” In the article he commends two individuals he feels are leaders making a difference in the world today. The two leaders are Malala Yousafzai and Bryan Stevenson.

Tutu had this to say about good leaders:

Good leadership is key. Good leaders with the ability to identify the challenges and the tenacity to act on them.

He sees Stevenson as a “champion for justice” and Yousafzai as a champion of women of and girls’ rights.

He acknowledges the challenges involved in working toward big change, but is hopeful that with good leadership, such as the leadership of Stevenson and Yousafzai, significant change is possible.

We may not be capable of changing the world in one fell swoop on our own, but when we swim together in the same good direction, we become an unstoppable force.

To read Tutu’s article click here.
For more information about Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson, click here.

Malala Documentary in the Works

Guggenheim and hdavis-gis team spent the last 18 months with Malala and her family. With the documentary they will show Malala’s personal story as well as the impact of her work and advocacy.It was announced this week that a documentary called “He Named Me Malala” will be released sometime later this year. The film is currently in its post-production stage. The rights to the documentary were acquired by Fox Searchlight Pictures and the film is under the direction of Davis Guggenheim. Guggenheim is well known for directing “Waiting for Superman” and “An Inconvenient Truth.”

Although Fox Searchlight Pictures does not often take on documentary films they had this to say about Malala’s story:

The chance to bring her story to a global audience will be an honor for all of us here at Searchlight.

For more information about this upcoming documentary click here.

Malala Receives Tamgha-e-Shujatt (Medal for Bravery)

Syed Ibne Abbas, High Commissioner to the United Kingdom, awarded Malala Yousafzai the prestigious Medal of Bravery on behalf of the President of Pakistan. The Commissioner commended Malala for being a symbol of hope and courage for her country.

Malala dedicated the civil award to the schoolchildren in Peshewar and schoolchildren accross Pakistan who are fighting for their education.

For more information click here.

All Girls Deserve Free, Quality Education

Malala met Amina in Nigeria this past summer and found out they have quite a bit in common. Both stood up for their education in countries where girls’ education is under attack. Both girls are now advocates for girls’ and children’s education. And now both girls are demanding that world leaders vote for 12 years of free, quality education for all children in the world when they meet this September. In particular they are fighting for all women and girls to be educated. Far too many women are only educated through primary school. Malala and Amina know this is not enough

When we imagine the power of all our sisters standing together on the shoulders of a quality education — our joy knows no bounds.

 –Malala and Amina
For more information click here.

Malala inspires girls to start #Girlwithabook campaign

Project #girlwithabook. Apparently girls with books are scary to the Taliban. Let’s get people to post pictures of themselves with books! A favorite book, a random book, a school book, you name it! Let’s do this. –OliviaOlivia and Lena were college students when Malala was attacked by the Taliban. Olivia was in Jordan and Lena was in Michigan, but they used Facebook to share their frustrations and outrage over the attack. Malala’s resilience and perseverance inspired the two girls from the United States to work together and begin the #girlwithabook social media campaign.

The girls began by collection photos from family and friends, but it wasn’t long before people from all over the world were sharing and sending photos holding books or signs that said “I stand with Malala.” The girls have been supported by multiple organizations including the UN, Half the Sky movement, National Women’s History Museum, and more. The women are using social media to raise awareness about girls’ education.

To learn more about their work visit their site here

You can also visit their social media pages:

 

Spring Course Sign Up

Faculty and Staff, are you considering using this year’s Go Big Read book “I Am Malala” in your spring course? To arrange free books for your students, fill out the web form here.
Malala Yousafzai made history this fall when she became the youngest winner of the Nobel Peace Prize. Malala’s activism and rousing speeches are a source of inspiration to students across campus. Malala’s book has sparked deep and engaging conversations across campus about religion, education, and culture. Examples include the event, “Breaking Stereotypes: Women in Islam” hosted by the Muslim Students Association and the event “Embattled Ideologies: I Am Malala and the Question of Women’s Education in Islam” hosted by the Lubar Institute for the Study of the Abrahamic Religions. You won’t want to miss the chance to include your students in these important conversations. 

Nobel Peace Prize Award Ceremony

From left to right, Malala’s two brothers, Mother, and Father

Malala Yousafzai and Kailash Satyarthi received the Nobel Peace Prize during an award ceremony in Oslo, Norway on December 10th. Malala accepted the Nobel Peace Prize medal and diploma while her family watched on with pride and clear emotion on their faces as she became the youngest recipient ever of a Nobel Prize.

Malala also brought 5 honored guests to the award ceremony that she mentions in her acceptance speech. Two of the young women, Shazia Ramzan and Kainat Riaz, were classmates of Malala’s. Shazia and Kainat were both shot during the 2012 Taliban attack that nearly ended Malala’s life.

From left to right, Amina Yusuf, Kainat Soomro, Shazia Ramzan,
Malala Yousafzai, Mazon Almellahan, and Kainat Riaz. 

The three other young women Malala brought as guests are all activists. Kainat Soomro is a young Pakistani woman who continues to fight for justice after a brutal sexual assault that took place when she was only 13 years old. Mazon Almellehan is a 16 year old education advocate and Syrian refugee. Malala’s last guest is Amina Yusuf. Amina is a 17 year old Nigerian girl who mentors young girls in Northern Nigeria.

Malala ended her speech with this important message:

“Let us become the first generation to decide to be the last that sees empty classrooms, lost childhoods, and wasted potential.
Let this be the last time that a boy or a girl spends their childhood in a factory.
Let this be the last time that a girl is forced into early child marriage.
Let this be the last time that an innocent child loses life in in war.
Let this be the last time that a child remains out of school.
Let this end with us.
And let us begin this ending…together…today…right here, right now.”

Click here to read the rest of Malala’s Nobel Lecture
Malala’s Full Acceptance Speech:

Malala’s school uniform to go on display

The Nobel Peace Prize Exhibition 2014-Malala and Kailash opens this Friday at the Nobel Peace Center in Oslo. The Exhibition tells the story of Malala and Kailash’s fight for children’s rights. Malala has recorded a personal video message and she provided the Nobel Peace Center with family photos of her life in Swat Valley that will be displayed at the exhibit. However, the most shocking part of the exhibit without a doubt will be the display of Malala’s blood stain school uniform from the day she was shot in the head by a member of the Taliban. The uniform will be on display at Malala’s own request.

In an interview for the exhibition Malala explained why she requested her uniform be displayed, “My school uniform is very important to me because when I was going to school I would wear it, the day I was attacked I was wearing this uniform. I was fighting for my right to go to school..to get education. Wearing a uniform made me feel that yes, I am a student. It is an important part of my life, now I want to show it to children, to people all around the world. This is my right, it is the right of every child, to go to school. This should not be neglected.”

Malala’s uniform has been kept by Malala’s family ever since the assassination attempt in October 2012. The executive director of the of the Nobel Peace Center, Bente Erichsen, said that “Malala’s blood-stained uniform is a strong and heartbreaking symbol of the forces many girls are fighting for the right to go to school. We are grateful that Malala has chosen to show it to the public in our exhibition.”

The exhibition will be free and open to the public from December 12th till August 31st, 2015. Below are pictures of the Nobel Peace Prize Exhibit team displaying Malala’s uniform and Malala’s explanation of why she requested that her uniform be on display.



Using Our Stories for a Cause: UW-Madison Students Speak Out

Malala Yousafzai is a model for young speakers and activists all over the world. Here in Madison, other young people are using their own life stories to promote social causes that matter to them. In this showcase event on Dec. 3rd, UW students from the Communication Arts 181 honors public speaking course will speak on a variety of topics that have impacted them, their families, and other folks on campus in a personal way.
Topics will include: combating water scarcity, revising anti-bullying campaigns, getting a regular full night’s sleep, promoting rail transport, preventing teen dating violence, supporting athletics, and more.
This event is free and open to the public. The event is Wednesday, Dec. 3rd, 6:00-7:30 pm, in 4070 Vilas Hall.