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Tag: I Am Malala

UW-Madison News reports on use of Go Big Read book on campus

Malala speaking to the United Nations in the Summer of 2013

The University of Wisconsin-Madison News site released an article this morning entitled, “Campus community reading ‘I Am Malala’ as semester begins.”

The article discusses why Chancellor Becky Blank chose the book from a list of possible books with a theme on service. The Chancellor told the 5,500+ incoming freshmen and transfer students at convocation that “Malala’s story is about the value of doing something – anything, even when it’s scary and even when you’re not sure it’s the exact right solution -rather than sitting around feeling hopeless.”

The article also talks to members of the campus community that have chosen to use the book this fall. Over 35+ courses have decided to use the book in their course material. Disciplines range from anthropology, English, enviornmental studies, nursing, political science, and education.

A group new to the Go Big Read program is the Lubar Institute for the Study of the Abrahamic Religions. The group was established to promote mutual understanding and civility among Jews, Christians, and Muslim after tensions arose following 9/11. To learn more about the different courses and groups participating in Go Big Read this year read the entire article by following this link: Campus community reading ‘I Am Malala’ as semester begins

UW-Madison Women & Leadership Book Discussion

October 15, 2014
March 11, 2015
4:00-5:30 pm Union South
I Am Malala
Malala Yousafzai and Christina Lamb

Book discussion led by the UW Women Deans

“When the Taliban took control of the Swat Valley in Pakistan, one girl spoke out. Malala Yousafzai refused to be silenced and fought for her right to an education. On Tuesday, October 9, 2012, when she was fifteen, she almost paid the ultimate price. She was shot in the head at point-blank range while riding the bus home from school, and few expected her to survive. Instead, Malala’s miraculous recovery has taken her on an extraordinary journey from a remote valley in northern Pakistan to the halls of the United Nations in New York. At seventeen, she has come a global symbol of peaceful protest and the youngest nominee ever for the Nobel Peace Prize. I Am Malala is her remarkable story.”

To register for one of these events, please visit:

October 15, 2014 Book discussion:
https://www.ohrd.wisc.edu/OHRDCatalogPortal/Default.aspx?CK=46103 

March 11, 2015 Book Discussion:
https://www.ohrd.wisc.edu/OHRDCatalogPortal/Default.aspx?CK=46390

**UW-Madison Women & Leadership events are generously supported by the UW Foundation Women’s Philanthropy Council**

Other partners include:
UW-Madison  Committee on Women in the University
UW-Madison Office of Human Resource Development
UW Women Deans
Questions: Contact Carrie Jensen, cjensen@ohr.wisc.edu, 265-8982

Dr. Asifa Quraishi-Landes: 2014 Wisconsin Festival of Ideas: A Background on Islamic Law and Constitutionalism
The Go Big Read book this year, “I Am Malala”, focuses on a religion and region of the world that many readers will be unfamiliar with, however throughout this fall we will be providing resources for readers to gain a deeper understanding of the themes and background of the book. 
The first resource is from Dr. Asifa Quraishi-Landes, an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Wisconsin who specializes in comparative Islamic and U.S.constitutional law. Asifa presented in the Distinguished Lecture Series at the 2014 Wisconsin Festival of Ideas on her current work and shared a background of what Islamic Constitutionalism means. Asifa provided definitions and the background of terms that we hear often in the media today, such as sharia, itjihad, and fiqh. 

Asifa has served as a public delegate on the United States Delegation to the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women, the Task Force on Religion and the Making of U.S. Foreign Policy for the
Chicago Council on Global Affairs, and as advisor to the Pew Task Force
on Religion & Public Life. You can find out more about Asifa, including her publications, educational background, and interests here: http://law.wisc.edu/profiles/aquraishi@wisc.edu

“I Am Malala” TimesTalks 
Malala Yousafzai was interviewed by New York Times correspondent Jodi Kantor for The New York Times TimesTalks series. Jodi asked about Malala’s life in Pakistan under the Taliban regime. She also had Malala talk about her campaign for universal education and how she is working to achieve her goals.

Malala displayed a humble sense of humor and a great deal of maturity for a 17 year old during the event. The interview allowed viewers to see a more personal side of the young activist. Malala discussed how much she misses her best friend, but that she does get to Skype her often to catch up and also to hear what is happening in her homeland of Swat Valley. Though not all the information she hears is hopeful. Malala expressed her frustration that girls she used to attend school with are engaged to be marry at only 17 years old and will no longer be able to continue their education.

Malala’s prevailing message throughout the interview was that Malala shared her story to inspire others to create change, she said “YOU should stand up for your rights, YOU should speak up.” Malala is currently working on education projects in Pakistan, Jordan, Kenya, and Nigeria. She shared that her own mother is now attending school five days a week to learn to read and write since she had never received an education. In a touching moment, Malala asked her mother to stand up in the crowd to introduce herself and explain why she is now learning how to read and speak English.

Watch the TimesTalks video below and share with us your thoughts on the interview.

Malala Calls on Global Leaders to Fund Education
250 million children are unable to read or write by the time they reach grade 4. Across the world, 57 million children are still without access to school. Today in Brussels education leaders from around the globe are speaking out for these children.

Global Partnership for Education is an international organization that focuses on supporting countries’ efforts to educate children from early primary school to secondary school. The GPE is comprised of donor governments, regional and international agencies, development banks, the private sector, and civil society organizations/NGOS. The GPE held a pledging conference in 2011 and were able to raise close to $2 billion dollars from 60 partners. These pledges have allowed GPE to build, rehabilitate, and equip 52,600 classrooms and train about 300,000 teachers mostly in primary education.

Credit: Global Partnership for Education

Earlier this month Malala Yousafzai joined other leading global education advocates by supporting the GPE. As a champion for the GPE, Malala has been speaking up for the rights of children to receive an education, and urging businesses, civil societies, and governments to work together on delivering education for all. The Malala Fund also provided a grant that allowed the first ever youth delegation of 12 young education advocates to attend the Second Replenishment Conference.

The Global Partnership for Education held their second pledging
conference today, June 26th, in Brussels with a goal of raising 3.5
billion dollars. Malala released a video this morning featuring children in developing countries fighting for their right to receive an education. Malala urged global leaders to work together to fund education and fulfill the promise of an education for every child.

The summit in Brussels has ended, and they have raised eight times the amount they had hoped for. The GPE received $28.5 billion in funding for the education of millions of children in more than 60 developing countries. The contributions from across the globe are a sign that education crisis awareness by activists, such as Malala, can lead to meaningful action. Today there is more hope than ever that the 57 million children without access to a school will be able to receive an education in the near future.

Shiza Shahid, Co-Founder of the Malala Fund, is Keynote Speaker for Go Big Read

In 2014, 57 million children are not enrolled in school. According to the United Nations, 53% of the children are girls, and 2/3 of the illiterate people in the world are women. Shiza Shahid is working with Malala Yousafzai to reverse this epidemic and empower girls to reach their potential through education.
 Shiza first met Malala when she was a sophomore in college at Stanford University. Shiza grew up in Pakistan just three hours from Malala’s home, and when she heard about Malala’s fight to keep her school open she knew that she needed to help. That summer Shiza planned a camp for Malala and 27 other girls in the capital of Pakistan. The camp’s goal was to empower them to be entrepreneurs and activists. 
It was only a few years later that Malala was shot by the Taliban, and Shiza traveled to be by her side in England. While recovering in the hospital, Malala realized that she wanted to turn her tragedy into a movement that could inspire and empower girls across the world. Malala, Malala’s father, and Shiza decided to create an organization with a mission to empower girls through education so that they can become agents of change in their communities. In October of 2013 the Malala Fund was officially launched. The Malala fund works with local partners around the world to help the 600 million girls in developing countries receive an education. The fund believes that education empowers girls to raise their voices, to unlock their potential, and to demand change. 
Shiza will be on campus October 27-28 to meet with small groups of students and to deliver a public talk at Varsity Hall.
Links to the Malala Fund’s website, Facebook, and Twitter are below:

Malala Yousafzai: “Girls in Nigeria are my sisters”

By now, most of us have heard the story of the Nigerian schoolgirls kidnapped by the extremist group Boko Haram in mid-April. As outrage and demands for action have spread across the globe, Malala Yousafzai, advocate for girls’ education and author of our 2014-15 Go Big Read book, sat down with CNN’s Christiane Amanpour for an interview.

“I thought that ‘my sisters are in prison now,'” Malala says, explaining her first thoughts on hearing about the abduction. “And I felt as if I should speak up for them, because I have a responsibility. I believe that we are sent to this earth as a community, and it’s our responsibility to take care of each other. The girls in Nigeria are my sisters, and it’s my responsibility that I speak up for my sisters.”
She added that Boko Haram “don’t really understand Islam…they are actually abusing the name of Islam, because they have forgotten that the word ‘Islam’ means peace. […] They are actually afraid of the power of women. They don’t want women to get empowered, to get education, and they don’t want women to achieve their goals. So I think these terrorists are afraid of women, and that’s why they are kidnapping women.”
You can watch the full interview here.

Go Big Read selects “I Am Malala” for 2014-15

The Taliban thought bullets would silence Malala Yousafzai.

But instead they made her voice stronger, and today the teenager from
Pakistan is known worldwide as a transformative advocate who embodies
the power of education for girls.

Her book, “I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban,” is the latest selection for Go Big Read, UW-Madison’s common-reading program.

Go Big Read organizers encouraged the campus community to suggest
titles that fit into a theme of service. Chancellor Rebecca Blank chose
“I Am Malala” from the short list that a selection committee culled from
nearly 200 nominated titles.

“Malala’s story offers our students and campus community a firsthand
account from a part of the world that is continuously in the news,”
Blank says. “Readers will connect with these experiences through her
convincing description of how she became a voice of protest against the
social restrictions she faced. Her story will lead our students to
reflect on the opportunities they have to use their own voice in the
world.”

Yousafzai begins the book, co-written with British journalist
Christina Lamb, by recounting the moment she was shot in the head in
October 2012 on her way home from school in Pakistan’s Swat Valley. The
rest of the book retraces the events that led up to that moment in a
region that is one of the world’s hotspots.

“It is difficult to imagine a chronicle of a war more moving, apart
from perhaps the diary of Anne Frank,” said a review in The Washington
Post. Time Out New York said Yousafzai’s touching story, “will not only
inform you of changing conditions in Pakistan, but inspire your
rebellious spirit.”
Yousafzai was 11 when she began writing a blog anonymously for the
BBC, describing life under Taliban rule from her hometown of Mingora, in
the northwest region of Pakistan.

She was awarded the country’s National Peace Award in 2012, which has
since been renamed the National Malala Peace Prize.She was nominated
for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2013 and was recently named by TIME
magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world. She and
her family now live in England, where she continues to go to school.

“Let us pick up our books and our pens,” the now 16-year-old told
young leaders from 100 countries at the United Nations Youth Assembly in
New York last year. “They are our most powerful weapons. One child, one
teacher, one book, and one pen can change the world. Education is the
only solution.”
Patrick McBride, associate dean for students at the UW School of
Medicine and Public Health and a member of the selection committee, said
the story will remind readers why they can’t take their right to an
education for granted.

“The rights of women, and the values of freedom, family, and
education are championed by this remarkable family,” McBride says.
“While the title sounds simple, when we read in the introduction
of where those words are spoken, it will bring chills to the reader and
become a cry for freedom around the world.”

Karen Crossley, associate director of operations for the Morgridge
Center for Public Service, also served on the selection committee and
says Yousafzai being close in age to most UW undergraduates will capture
the attention of students.

“Malala’s commitment to composing a better world defines service in a highly personal way,” Crossley says.

Planning is underway for how students, faculty and staff will use the
book in classrooms and for special events associated with “I Am
Malala.”

Yousafzai will be in her senior year of high school and therefore
unable to come to campus, but organizers are arranging for a speaker
connected to the book who will give a public talk this fall.
UW-Madison instructors interested in using the book can request a review copy here.

Copies of the book will be given to first-year students at the
Chancellor’s Convocation for New Students and to students using the book
in their classes.

More information about the ongoing Go Big Read program and plans for this fall can be found here.

Jenny Price, UW-Madison University Communications