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University of Wisconsin–Madison

Tag: Health Care

“Informing Consent” Opens to Enthusiastic Reviews

The Ebling Library for the Health Sciences on UW’s West Campus recently opened an exhibit entitled “Informing Consent: Unwitting Subjects in Medicine’s Pursuit of Beneficial Knowledge” in conjunction with “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.”

Artifacts, books, journals, photographs and magazines from Ebling and five other campus collection create narratives in cases entitled, Honoring Henrietta, The Science of HeLa, UW Cancer Research (McCardle), Patenting Life, Immortal Skin (the story of UW’s Dr. Allen-Hoffman), HeLa in the Press, The Art of Healing, Human Subject Experimentation in our Own Backyard, Informing Consent, and Captive Subjects-Is There Such a Thing as Voluntary?
Students, faculty, historians and family were heard to exclaim, “Great information- way to put the Skloot book in perspective, “Impressive amount of thoughtful work,” “Thanks so much for helping me to better understand [these subjects].”

The exhibit in the 3rd floor Historical Reading Room, is open the hours the same hours as those of Ebling until March 31, 2011. Curators, Micaela Sullivan-Fowler and History of Science Graduate Student, Lynnette Regouby are available to give tours for classes, book clubs, etc. msullivan@library.wisc.edu

And finally, this site may be of interest.

Photos by Micaela Sullivan-Fowler

Michael Pollan Column in New York Times

Michael Pollan recently wrote an opinion column for the New York Times in response to President Obama’s speech on health care.

In the article, Pollan argues that the biggest problem with health care in the U.S. is not the system itself so much as our poor diet and high rates of obesity.

Pollan states:

Even the most efficient health care system that the administration could hope to
devise would still confront a rising tide of chronic disease linked to diet.
That’s why our success in bringing health care costs under control ultimately
depends on whether Washington can summon the political will to take on and
reform a second, even more powerful industry: the food industry.

Read the entire New York Times opinion column