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Tag: gardening

Eagle Heights Community Gardens: Visit on Campus Transit!

Fall is an ideal time to visit the beautiful Eagle Heights Community Gardens. With a patchwork of nearly 500 garden spots, the diversity in plantings, harvests, cultures, and farming techniques is amazing.

The gardens, which are planted voluntarily by the residents of Eagle Heights, have become a social hub of the community, bringing together people from nearly every nation on earth-speaking as many as 60 different languages!

In addition to the people and the crops, you’ll also see a variety of wildlife. Species from sandhill cranes to minks have been spotted feasting on the sunflowers, raspberries, and other plentiful crops.

Have we piqued your interest? If so, consider visiting the gardens for yourself! You can easily ride the free campus bus (Route 80 or 84 to Eagle Heights) or bike or walk along scenic lakeshore path for a more leisurely commute. If you would like assistance in planning your route, contact UW Commuter Solutions!

Find out more about the Eagle Heights Community Gardens on their website

This News item reprinted with permission from UW Commuter Solutions. Go to http://www.wisc.edu/trans/ and click “UW Commuter Solutions.”

Aug. 23-29: National Community Gardening Week

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has declared August 23rd-29th to be “National Community Gardening Week“!
“Community gardens provide numerous benefits including opportunities for local food production, resource conservation, and neighborhood beautification,” said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack.
“But they also promote family and community interaction and enhance opportunities to eat healthy, nutritious foods. Each of these benefits is something we can and should strive for.”
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UW Madison Gardens and Housing “Keeping it Local”


“A new local food initiative on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus is starting very close to home. For the first time this summer, UW Housing’s Dining and Culinary Services is sourcing some of its produce from a small plot in Allen Centennial Gardens on campus. Diners at Frank’s Place – the dining facility in Holt Commons – have been enjoying fresh greens, radishes and onions grown just a few hundred feet away, and some of the lettuce in the Babcock Dairy Store’s sandwiches and salads may have had a shorter trip to the store than the patron eating it.”

You can read more about this initiative in the full story by Jill Sakai of University Communications. This is a story with some close ties to In Defense of Food and Go Big Read. Monica Theis, a Food Science instructor who “assumed responsibility for the garden four years ago,” is participating in a Center for Biology Education faculty book group that has been hard at work developing and sharing approaches to using the book in courses. Monica is a great contributor to the planning that’s underway to assure rich discussions of the book throughout the year. Housing is a co-sponsor of Pollan’s visit, and it’s great to see how agile they are in implementing some of the principles in the book in our dining halls.

Finally, there couldn’t be a more beautiful setting than Allen Centennial Gardens. I would love to brighten up our sites with some supplemental photos if any amateur photographers would like to take photos, and the full story has some beautiful, captioned photos.

Image of Monica Theis by Bryce Richter, University Communications
Sarah McDaniel

Soon to be a Common Experience!

I was delighted to observe two women on my evening bus, one with title in hand, discussing In Defense of Food. Seeing as I was seated nearby, I was able to catch snatches from their conversation–that being an animated appraisal of Pollan’s adage to ‘not eat anything one’s great-grandmother would not recognize as food’ (Section III, Chapter Two). This suggestion from the text led them to share memories of family meals and food products available, then and now.

Of course, it resonates with me, too. Pastured as I was between my parents’ rural homestead and my grandparents’ farm, I was an equal opportunity diner drifting between whichever house was offering the best meal. My grandmother’s tour de force, though, was noon-lunch, and I was easily on hand. Given the enormous garden she cultivated, this noon-lunch always featured an abundance of whole foods. And, presentation mattered, with each course and side requiring its dedicated dishware and service. Flowers, too, with a heady fragrance (lilacs and peonies) festooned the table…

I now pause in my narrative and rambling nostalgia, to ask this blog readership…what are your food memories?

Urban farming movement ‘like a revolution’

By Dave M. Matthews
CNN

ATLANTA, Georgia (CNN) — On a plot of soil, nestled against the backdrop of skyscrapers in downtown Atlanta, Georgia, a group of residents are turning a lack of access to fresh produce into a revival of old traditions and self-empowerment.http://www.cnn.com/2009/LIVING/06/29/bia.urban.farming/index.html