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University of Wisconsin–Madison

Tag: food

Sampling Cookbook Collections

As we enjoy access to several months of great farm-market food, you may find yourself wondering how to prepare or store the bounty. If this is your conundrum of late, consider browsing Steenbock Library’s cookbook collection to find recipes to old standards and new flavors.

The cookbook collection began with a generous donation in 1965 by Madison resident Mortimer Levitan as a memorial to his mother. This initial donation included 2615 titles. Today, the cookbook collection continues to grow and focuses upon culinary history, trends, and regional and world cuisines.

Should you wish to sample the cookbook collection, it can be browsed in the first floor book stacks, (TX call-number range) and vertical files (filing cabinets). In addition to the cookbook collection at Steenbock, other cookbooks, of popular interest, can be found at College Library. Ebling Library also has cookbooks–many that address dining and food considerations during health events or enduring medical conditions. All books can be found using the MadCat catalog–keyword, “cookery” for the comprehensive list. Otherwise, speak with your friendly campus librarians for assistance.

Bon appetit!

Farm Fresh Atlas

Think globally, but eat locally, using the Southern Wisconsin Farm Fresh Atlas! Use the atlas to locate farms, markets and restaurant partners who supply fresh, area-grown produce and food products. Do note that many of the area growers welcome visitors with special events, u-pick options, hay-rides and tours. The 2009 print edition of the atlas was initially released at the first Dane County Farmers’ Market of the season on April 18. It can still be found at several university and Madison-area locations, including Steenbock Library. Should you be looking for options, apart from the southern Wisconsin area, consult the sites for Wisconsin Farm Fresh Atlases or Local Harvest. The Farm Fresh Atlas has been developed by the REAP Food Group in cooperation with the Dane County Farmers’ Market, the Friends of the Dane County Farmers’ Market, and the UW-Madison Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems.

Recipe for Victory: Food and Cooking in Wartime

Mock fish created from hominy grits and nuts? Or better yet, a bratwurst made of beans? To quote Rachel Ray, “Yummo!”

On behalf of the University of Wisconsin Digital Collections Center (UWDCC), I’d like to share with you one of our digital collections that complements some of the key issues and themes raised in this year’s Go Big Read selection, In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto, by Michael Pollan.

Created from materials housed at Steenbock library and selected by Information Services Librarian Barbara Hamel, Recipe for Victory: Food and Cooking in Wartime (http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1711.dl/HumanEcol.WWIHomeCook) presents books and government publications documenting our national effort to promote and implement a plan to make food the key to winning World War I.

This online collection contains materials that explain the world food situation, the nutritional value of foods, how to grow productive gardens in less than ideal conditions, and cookbooks with recipes for dealing with scarcity of various commodities such as meat and wheat. Many of the materials in this collection were published by the University of Wisconsin, Agricultural Extension Service between 1917 and 1919.

As head of the U. S. Food Administration, Herbert Hoover launched a campaign to conserve food at the onset of World War I. Americans were urged to cut food waste, substitute scarce for plentiful ingredients and participate in a food-conservation program popularly known as “Hooverizing,” which included wheatless Mondays and Wednesdays, meatless Tuesdays, and porkless Thursdays and Saturdays.

While circumstances for this particular attention to our nation’s food and consumption issues may differ from those inspiring Pollan’s recent works, titles such as Vernon Kellogg’s The Food Problem (1918) and Edmund Spriggs’ Food and How to Save it (1918) provide historical context for better understanding nutrition, conservation, food industry and economics and Americans’ eating habits, in general, during that period.

And, nearly 100 years later, the lessons ring oddly familiar. In her forward to Wheatless and Meatless Days (1918), Pauline Dunwell Partridge advises readers to “more extensively use vegetables and fruits, eliminate waste and consume more freely, locally grown perishable foods.”

For a complete list of titles included in this online library collection, visit:

Recipe for Victory: Food and Cooking in Wartime
http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1711.dl/HumanEcol.WWIHomeCook

For more information about the UWDCC, visit our Web site at http://uwdc.library.wisc.edu