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Tag: food culture

Keep Reading!

One of the compelling, if not enjoyable features of the Amazon.com web catalog, is its ability to show what other books and media its customers are purchasing in addition to the title with which you began your search–thereby supplying a handy way to discover items of related interest. An Amazon query on the campus common book selection, In Defense of Food, reveals the following selection of titles, among many others. Ettlinger, S. (2008). Twinkie, Deconstructed: My Journey to Discover How the Ingredients Found in Processed Foods Are Grown, Mined (Yes, Mined), and Manipulated into What America Eats. Plume.
Kingsolver, B., Kingsolver, C., & Hopp, S. L. (2008). Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life. Harper Perennial.
Menzel, P. (2007). Hungry Planet: What the World Eats (illustrated edition.). Material World.
Nestle, M. (2007b). Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition, and Health, Revised and Expanded Edition (2nd ed.). University of California Press.
Patel, R. (2008). Stuffed and Starved: The Hidden Battle for the World Food System. Melville House.
Petrini, C. (2007). Slow Food Nation: Why Our Food Should Be Good, Clean, And Fair. Rizzoli Ex Libris.
Planck, N. (2007). Real Food: What to Eat and Why. Bloomsbury USA.
Roberts, P. (2009). The End of Food (Reprint.). Mariner Books.
Schlosser, E. (2005). Fast Food Nation. Harper Perennial.
Shiva, V. (2000). Stolen Harvest: The Hijacking of the Global Food Supply (Soft Cover.). South End Press.
Simon, M. (2006). Appetite for Profit: How the food industry undermines our health and how to fight back (1st ed.). Nation Books.
Wansink, B. (2007). Mindless Eating: Why We Eat More Than We Think. Bantam.
Wilson, C., & Schlosser, E. (2007). Chew On This: Everything You Don’t Want to Know About Fast Food. Sandpiper.
Woolf, A. (2008). King Corn. DVD, DOCURAMA. Speak with your librarians for assistance locating these and any other related titles.
With thanks to Bob S for this blog post.

Soon to be a Common Experience!

I was delighted to observe two women on my evening bus, one with title in hand, discussing In Defense of Food. Seeing as I was seated nearby, I was able to catch snatches from their conversation–that being an animated appraisal of Pollan’s adage to ‘not eat anything one’s great-grandmother would not recognize as food’ (Section III, Chapter Two). This suggestion from the text led them to share memories of family meals and food products available, then and now.

Of course, it resonates with me, too. Pastured as I was between my parents’ rural homestead and my grandparents’ farm, I was an equal opportunity diner drifting between whichever house was offering the best meal. My grandmother’s tour de force, though, was noon-lunch, and I was easily on hand. Given the enormous garden she cultivated, this noon-lunch always featured an abundance of whole foods. And, presentation mattered, with each course and side requiring its dedicated dishware and service. Flowers, too, with a heady fragrance (lilacs and peonies) festooned the table…

I now pause in my narrative and rambling nostalgia, to ask this blog readership…what are your food memories?