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Tag: creative

Marie Curie & Radium

The talented trainers at DesignLab have done it again.  A few weeks ago, we showed you the Radioactive-inspired pages they made as part of their “training boot camp” (if you haven’t checked those out, definitely do so now!).  Today, DesignLab TA Kevin Gibbons sent us a comic he created, depicting Marie Curie’s “love-kill” relationship with radium, as part of a workshop on e-writing assignments. (Click to enlarge.)

Want to make your own comic or other media project?  Visit the DesignLab website and find out how to set up an appointment with one of their talented TAs.

As a sidenote, we love it when people send us visual work inspired by or relating to Radioactive!  If you’d like one of your creations to be featured on the blog, send us an email at gobigread@library.wisc.edu.  Please refer to this post for further information about submission guidelines.

Brooke Williams, GBR grad student

Playing Radioactive games

It’s Friday, and what’s more, it’s a cold, gray, drizzly Friday.  Hopefully, the weekend will bring us some nice weather, so we can get out and enjoy the slowly-changing leaves and all those other lovely autumn things (after all, today officially marks the start of the new season!). But for now, it’s Friday, and it’s the perfect kind of day to spend inside.

With that said, I’m going to point everyone in the direction of this beautiful website, which has been on the blog before.  For those who haven’t checked it out yet, the site is a collaboration between the New York Public Library and Parsons the New School for Design.  Intended to work with last year’s exhibit at the famous public library on 42nd Street and 5th Avenue in New York City, the website is very much in the aesthetic of the book, but also includes videos, games and other interactive features.

With the “Curiograph,” you can make your own (digital) cyanotype images in just a few short steps; you can also explore the Curies’ laboratory, simulated with items from the NYPL’s collections, and watch a video on how to make a real cyanotype print.

(And if you’re interested in doing so, then I’m also going to point you over here, to information about a cyanotype workshop that’s coming in October, hosted by the Madison Public Library and the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art!)

My personal favorite game, however, is the Raidon Game: follow various mini-missions to collect all the crystals needed and deliver them to the Curies.  It’s a little like living inside the world of the book, if only for a few minutes.

So there you have it.  The best way to spend a rainy Friday afternoon?  Easy answer: playing Radioactive games with Pierre and Marie!

Have fun!

Brooke Williams, grad student assistant for Go Big Read

DesignLab creates their own Radioactive images

DesignLab will be supporting projects associated with this year’s Go Big Read program.  During training boot camp, the DesignLab TAs each produced a response to the content and aesthetics of Radioactive by responding to one of the stories or sections of the book by creating an additional page or layout of a 2-page spread.

DesignLab is located in College Library, room 2250.  To find out more or to make an appointment with a TA, check out the DesignLab website here.  In the meantime, enjoy these gorgeous Radioactive-themed pages.  (Click to enlarge–it’s worth it!)



“Eusapia,” Dominique Haller



“Scintillating,” Melanie Wallace



“Glo Paint,”T.J. Kalaitzidis



“The Other Curie,” Erin Schambereck

 

“Radioactive Articles,” Steel Wagstaff

 

“Radioactive Man,” Mitch Schwartz



“Family,” Kevin Gibbons



“Conversation,” Dan Banda



Content Submitted by Rosemary Bodolay
Associate Director for Design Lab
 

Our Nation of Others: Submit your Creative and Artistic Reactions

To encourage a variety of dialogs with this year’s “Go Big Read” selection, UW-Madison’s Memorial Library, Latin American, Caribbean and Iberian Studies Program, University Health Services, and the School of Education will hold a juried art and literature competition for creative and artistic responses to Enrique’s Journey.

All members of the Madison community, including students of all ages, are encouraged to submit a creative work made in reaction to Enrique’s Journey.

Submissions can be in the form of literary works (poems, short stories or essays) or visual works (photographs, paintings, sculpture, collage, etc.). A committee made up of UW faculty, students, and community members will choose the best works, which will be featured in a campus exhibit in Spring of 2012. The creators of the best works will also be recognized at a public awards ceremony and reception to be held in conjunction with the exhibit.

Please watch for a formal call for submissions, to be posted on the Go Big Read web site and distributed widely in late September 2011.