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Woven Gardens of Hope: Afghan Women’s Carpets Exhibit

 

The Woven Gardens of Hope: Afghan Women’s Carpets Exhibit opens today at the Helen Louise Allen Textile Collection in Nicholas Hall. The exhibition highlights a community-based program to empower Afghan women through weaving of carpets following centuries-old techniques to create a sustainable quality of life for their families. Their carpets will be shown within the context of historic carpets and textiles from this region and culture, extending a past tradition into the present.

The gallery is free and open to the public. The exhibit will be open from January 23rd through March 1st and will have five featured events during that time. The first featured event is an opening ceremony this Sunday, January 25. To learn more visit the exhibit’s site here

It’s what WE do.

The Center for First Year Experience released a video this week featuring young and bright minded students enjoying the experience of attending the University of Wisconsin.

Students are offered resources from University Housing, Recreational Sports, Wisconsin Athletics, UW-Madison Police Department, Wisconsin Union, and our own Go Big Read Program.

All of these resources help students have the best Wisconsin Experience possible!

Comment below to share what you think of the video.

 

UW-Madison News reports on use of Go Big Read book on campus

Malala speaking to the United Nations in the Summer of 2013

The University of Wisconsin-Madison News site released an article this morning entitled, “Campus community reading ‘I Am Malala’ as semester begins.”

The article discusses why Chancellor Becky Blank chose the book from a list of possible books with a theme on service. The Chancellor told the 5,500+ incoming freshmen and transfer students at convocation that “Malala’s story is about the value of doing something – anything, even when it’s scary and even when you’re not sure it’s the exact right solution -rather than sitting around feeling hopeless.”

The article also talks to members of the campus community that have chosen to use the book this fall. Over 35+ courses have decided to use the book in their course material. Disciplines range from anthropology, English, enviornmental studies, nursing, political science, and education.

A group new to the Go Big Read program is the Lubar Institute for the Study of the Abrahamic Religions. The group was established to promote mutual understanding and civility among Jews, Christians, and Muslim after tensions arose following 9/11. To learn more about the different courses and groups participating in Go Big Read this year read the entire article by following this link: Campus community reading ‘I Am Malala’ as semester begins

Go Big Read selects “I Am Malala” for 2014-15

The Taliban thought bullets would silence Malala Yousafzai.

But instead they made her voice stronger, and today the teenager from
Pakistan is known worldwide as a transformative advocate who embodies
the power of education for girls.

Her book, “I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban,” is the latest selection for Go Big Read, UW-Madison’s common-reading program.

Go Big Read organizers encouraged the campus community to suggest
titles that fit into a theme of service. Chancellor Rebecca Blank chose
“I Am Malala” from the short list that a selection committee culled from
nearly 200 nominated titles.

“Malala’s story offers our students and campus community a firsthand
account from a part of the world that is continuously in the news,”
Blank says. “Readers will connect with these experiences through her
convincing description of how she became a voice of protest against the
social restrictions she faced. Her story will lead our students to
reflect on the opportunities they have to use their own voice in the
world.”

Yousafzai begins the book, co-written with British journalist
Christina Lamb, by recounting the moment she was shot in the head in
October 2012 on her way home from school in Pakistan’s Swat Valley. The
rest of the book retraces the events that led up to that moment in a
region that is one of the world’s hotspots.

“It is difficult to imagine a chronicle of a war more moving, apart
from perhaps the diary of Anne Frank,” said a review in The Washington
Post. Time Out New York said Yousafzai’s touching story, “will not only
inform you of changing conditions in Pakistan, but inspire your
rebellious spirit.”
Yousafzai was 11 when she began writing a blog anonymously for the
BBC, describing life under Taliban rule from her hometown of Mingora, in
the northwest region of Pakistan.

She was awarded the country’s National Peace Award in 2012, which has
since been renamed the National Malala Peace Prize.She was nominated
for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2013 and was recently named by TIME
magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world. She and
her family now live in England, where she continues to go to school.

“Let us pick up our books and our pens,” the now 16-year-old told
young leaders from 100 countries at the United Nations Youth Assembly in
New York last year. “They are our most powerful weapons. One child, one
teacher, one book, and one pen can change the world. Education is the
only solution.”
Patrick McBride, associate dean for students at the UW School of
Medicine and Public Health and a member of the selection committee, said
the story will remind readers why they can’t take their right to an
education for granted.

“The rights of women, and the values of freedom, family, and
education are championed by this remarkable family,” McBride says.
“While the title sounds simple, when we read in the introduction
of where those words are spoken, it will bring chills to the reader and
become a cry for freedom around the world.”

Karen Crossley, associate director of operations for the Morgridge
Center for Public Service, also served on the selection committee and
says Yousafzai being close in age to most UW undergraduates will capture
the attention of students.

“Malala’s commitment to composing a better world defines service in a highly personal way,” Crossley says.

Planning is underway for how students, faculty and staff will use the
book in classrooms and for special events associated with “I Am
Malala.”

Yousafzai will be in her senior year of high school and therefore
unable to come to campus, but organizers are arranging for a speaker
connected to the book who will give a public talk this fall.
UW-Madison instructors interested in using the book can request a review copy here.

Copies of the book will be given to first-year students at the
Chancellor’s Convocation for New Students and to students using the book
in their classes.

More information about the ongoing Go Big Read program and plans for this fall can be found here.

Jenny Price, UW-Madison University Communications

UW-Madison and the Peace Corps

Did you know that UW-Madison has a long, proud history with the Peace Corps? Last week, our campus was again named the nation’s “top producer of Peace Corps volunteers.” You can read more about our history with the Peace Corps here.

Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

This news comes at a particularly interesting time, as Go Big Read’s 2014-15 theme is “service.” Last week, the selection committee met to establish a shortlist of books to consider; for the next few weeks, we’ll be reading and discussing these books. It’s an exciting time, and while we can’t give any hints yet, we can’t wait until we make an official announcement!

There are a lot of reasons to be proud of being a Badger, and our history of service is definitely one of them. You can find out more about the Peace Corps on the organization website, and check out the annual rankings of universities. If you’re interested in volunteering for the Peace Corps, stop by the UW-Madison Peace Corps office in 156 Red Gym, or visit their website.

Ozeki Speaks at Union South Tonight, Wisconsin Public Radio Show Now Archived

Go Big Read welcomes Ruth Ozeki to Union South tonight, October 28th, at 7 p.m.  No tickets are required and doors open at 6 p.m.  The event will also be streamed live on the web, and you can find that link on the Go Big Read home page (http://www.gobigread.wisc.edu/). 

If you want a preview, Anne Strainchamps of the Wisconsin Public Radio show “45 North” recently interviewed Ozeki, and the engaging, half-hour interview is now archived online (http://www.wpr.org/shows/ruth-ozeki/).

Hope you can join us in person or online!

Sarah McDaniel
Go Big Read

Documentary Film Screening of ‘Bully’ at Madison Public Library- Central Library- Wednesday 10/23 at 6:30

I just watched Bully tonight. It is a most powerful movie.  It puts on
screen what Nao, in A Tale for the Time Being, experienced in her
school.  The film follows a few children as they endure abuse by their
classmates on the bus, in the halls and on the playgrounds of their
schools.  It portrays the pain and shame, and the hopelessness they feel
as their teachers, school leaders and even parents fail to protect
them. It shows the pain of the parents who try to help their children
and fight to get stubborn administrations to move towards protecting
them.  And it shows the torment of parents of children who despaired and
took their lives.  
While the film did not touch on the cyber-bullying Nao was subjected to,
it was able to portray the pain these children feel and make clear how
suicide feels like the only option.  

The
film fortunately ends on a positive note. In honor of one of the
children who committed suicide, one father teaches himself about the
internet, gets on Facebook and joins a movement to stop bullying. 
Called Stand For The Silent, the group encourages children to befriend a
bullied child, and offers education and tools to children and schools
to help the bullied.

If you are interested in seeing Bully and hearing the reactions of others, come to the Central Library, 201 W. Mifflin St. on Wednesday, October 23 at 6:30 pm. 
After we view the film, a supportive, thoughtful discussion will be
moderated by Susan Simon of WISC-TV3 News Team (WISC-TV3 has been
sponsoring a Time for Kids Buddy project to encourage kids to be a
buddy, not a bully). Amy Bellmore, PhD, UW Associate Professor of
Educational Psychology and Dr. Joanna Bisgrove, Family Medicine Physician from DeanCare will join us for the discussion. 
 If you can’t make it Wednesday, there will be a final screening of the film will be on Saturday, November 2 at 1 pm at the Meadowridge Library, 5740 Raymond Rd.  http://www.madisonpubliclibrary.org/new/bully-film-screenings-discussions

Blog post written by:
Lisa M., Librarian atMadison Public Library- Central

*Poster for Bully.

“Bully” Screenings at Madison Public Library

Poster for Bully.

Much of A Tale for the Time Being is concerned with the cruel treatment of Nao at the hands of her classmates. While these scenes are uncomfortable and frequently disturbing to read, the reality is that over 13 million American kids will be bullied this year. The documentary Bully (formerly The Bully Project) takes a hard look at bullies and their victims.

Join Madison Public Library for free screenings of Bully, followed by facilitated discussions about bullying. Screenings are being held at several branches throughout October and November, and do not require pre-registration. For dates and locations, check out the MPL event page or our own Go Big Read event calendar.
Bully is rated PG-13 for intense thematic material, disturbing content, and some strong language, all involving kids.

A Tale for the Time Being is now available as an eBook!

Are you a Kindle person, a Nook person, or an iPad person? Penguin Books, publisher of A Tale for the Time Being, announced on September 25th that their eBook catalog is now available via OverDrive for free download to portable e-readers including Nooks, Kindles and iPads. The Wisconsin Public Library Consortium, which includes Madison Public Library and all South Central Library System public libraries, has added 25 copies of this year’s Go Big Read book to the WPLC digital library.

This eBook is available to read with the OverDrive Read browser reader, as well as most devices and Kindle. (Of note to Kindle users:  Penguin ebook titles are available for Kindle users via the USB sideloading only.)  Public library users may already be familiar with this process. If not, this OverDrive Help article covers it, or users can call their local library for help.

If you are not familiar with Overdrive, start here!

Go Big Read book discussions

Have you already finished A Tale for the Time Being? Are you disappointed that there’s more than a month to go until our author event on October 28? Have no fear!

Madison Public Library is partnering with Go Big Read to host book discussions throughout the community. All discussions are free and open to the public, with no pre-registration required; all you have to do is show up (and probably read the book first)! No matter where you live in Madison, odds are a library near you has a discussion coming up sometime soon.

This month alone, you could head south along Park Street to check out the discussion at Goodman Branch this Saturday. Or take the opportunity to hang out in the gorgeous new Central Library (side note, who’s going to Stacked! tonight?) on September 25 by participating in their evening discussion. And Meadowridge Branch is holding a discussion next Saturday.

October and November are chock full of MPL/GBR book discussions, too, as well as other events (Kanji-writing workshop, anyone?). If you want to check out your library’s discussion group or find one that fits in your schedule, visit our Events page.