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University of Wisconsin–Madison

Tag: campus library collections

Go Big Read Exhibit in Memorial Library

Do you have favorite literary title(s) that celebrate good food and good eating?

An exhibit case on the first floor of Memorial includes some Go-Big-Read-related selections from the UW Madison Libraries. If you have favorite titles, tell askspecial@library.wisc.edu so that we can include your suggestions when we expand this exhibit, around September 15, to two or three exhibit cases in the Circulation Desk area.

Jill Rosenshield, Associate Curator
University of Wisconsin–Madison Libraries Special Collections

Keep Reading!

One of the compelling, if not enjoyable features of the Amazon.com web catalog, is its ability to show what other books and media its customers are purchasing in addition to the title with which you began your search–thereby supplying a handy way to discover items of related interest. An Amazon query on the campus common book selection, In Defense of Food, reveals the following selection of titles, among many others. Ettlinger, S. (2008). Twinkie, Deconstructed: My Journey to Discover How the Ingredients Found in Processed Foods Are Grown, Mined (Yes, Mined), and Manipulated into What America Eats. Plume.
Kingsolver, B., Kingsolver, C., & Hopp, S. L. (2008). Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life. Harper Perennial.
Menzel, P. (2007). Hungry Planet: What the World Eats (illustrated edition.). Material World.
Nestle, M. (2007b). Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition, and Health, Revised and Expanded Edition (2nd ed.). University of California Press.
Patel, R. (2008). Stuffed and Starved: The Hidden Battle for the World Food System. Melville House.
Petrini, C. (2007). Slow Food Nation: Why Our Food Should Be Good, Clean, And Fair. Rizzoli Ex Libris.
Planck, N. (2007). Real Food: What to Eat and Why. Bloomsbury USA.
Roberts, P. (2009). The End of Food (Reprint.). Mariner Books.
Schlosser, E. (2005). Fast Food Nation. Harper Perennial.
Shiva, V. (2000). Stolen Harvest: The Hijacking of the Global Food Supply (Soft Cover.). South End Press.
Simon, M. (2006). Appetite for Profit: How the food industry undermines our health and how to fight back (1st ed.). Nation Books.
Wansink, B. (2007). Mindless Eating: Why We Eat More Than We Think. Bantam.
Wilson, C., & Schlosser, E. (2007). Chew On This: Everything You Don’t Want to Know About Fast Food. Sandpiper.
Woolf, A. (2008). King Corn. DVD, DOCURAMA. Speak with your librarians for assistance locating these and any other related titles.
With thanks to Bob S for this blog post.

Children of the Corn Belt

As “corny” as it may seem, we really should spend some time thinking about corn. As a child, a corn field could frighten me. Once it surpassed “knee high by the Fourth of July” and my diminutive height, the rustle of the stalks and the greenish cast of the field would set my imagination on high alert–running wild with thoughts of that lurking beyond the first row. (Weirdly, as an adult, though, I enjoy Shyamalan’s movie, “Signs” for how brilliantly he captures that eeriness of a stand of corn).
These musings aside, the transformation from successful grass to commodity crop generates another kind of awe and proves to be an interesting history–and one that is well-documented within library collections. Among these collections are the titles listed below. Speak with your librarians for assistance locating these and related titles. Additional search terms, for use in library catalogs and journal indexes, include: maize, teosinte, and zea mays. Title: Handbook of Maize: Its Biology / edited by Jeff L. Bennetzen, Sarah C. Hake.
Publisher: New York: Springer, 2009.
Description: ix, 587 p.: ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.
Notes: Includes bibliographical references and index.

Title: Corn: Origin, History, Technology, and Production /editors, C. Wayne Smith, Javier Betran, E.C.A. Runge.
Publisher: Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley, c2004.
Description: xi, 949 p., [8] p. of plates: ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.
Notes: Includes bibliographical references and index.Author: Fussell, Betty Harper.
Title: The Story of Corn / Betty Fussell.
Publisher: New York: Knopf, 1992.
Description: 356 p.: ill. ; 25 cm.
Notes: Includes bibliographical references (p. [335]-344) and index.

“I begin with the proposition that eating is an agricultural act.”*

The Wisconsin Book Festival, in partnership with the Aldo Leopold Foundation, has announced that Wendell Berry will join the festival as one of its featured speakers. While the specific date and venue for his presentation have yet to be posted, do mark your calendars for the festival, October 7-11, 2009.

Michael Pollan draws inspiration from Berry, citing him in several passages from In Defense of Food. Texts cited include “The Pleasures of Eating” in What Are People For?: Essays* and The Unsettling of America: Culture and Agriculture.

Many of Wendell Berry’s essays, novels and poetry can be found in campus library collections. Speak with your librarians for assistance.

Sampling Cookbook Collections

As we enjoy access to several months of great farm-market food, you may find yourself wondering how to prepare or store the bounty. If this is your conundrum of late, consider browsing Steenbock Library’s cookbook collection to find recipes to old standards and new flavors.

The cookbook collection began with a generous donation in 1965 by Madison resident Mortimer Levitan as a memorial to his mother. This initial donation included 2615 titles. Today, the cookbook collection continues to grow and focuses upon culinary history, trends, and regional and world cuisines.

Should you wish to sample the cookbook collection, it can be browsed in the first floor book stacks, (TX call-number range) and vertical files (filing cabinets). In addition to the cookbook collection at Steenbock, other cookbooks, of popular interest, can be found at College Library. Ebling Library also has cookbooks–many that address dining and food considerations during health events or enduring medical conditions. All books can be found using the MadCat catalog–keyword, “cookery” for the comprehensive list. Otherwise, speak with your friendly campus librarians for assistance.

Bon appetit!